Issue 12  •  Spring 2013

Wham Bam Thank You Jam

Written by Rivka Berkowitz
SummerHello.jpgIt’s starting to get chilly out! Sometimes a little too chilly. Hopefully you stocked up on fresh fruit jams for the cold fall and winter nights. If not, make sure you follow these simple directions next year and gather all the fruit when it is finally back in season. The problem is that berries grow mold faster than Jenny Humphrey can sew drugs into a weird ’80s inspired bolero. It’s not always easy to keep up.
 
Well, there is another way. Got more fruit than you can handle? Maybe your CSA keeps on coming and you’re running out of recipe ideas or counter space . . . Got some sugar in the pantry? You’re in luck! You’re all ready to make some jam.

It’s starting to get chilly out! Sometimes a little too chilly. Hopefully you stocked up on fresh fruit jams for the cold fall and winter nights. If not, make sure you follow these simple directions next year and gather all the fruit when it is finally back in season. The problem is that berries grow mold faster than Jenny Humphrey can sew drugs into a weird ’80s inspired bolero. It’s not always easy to keep up.

Well, there is another way. Got more fruit than you can handle? Maybe your CSA keeps on coming and you’re running out of recipe ideas or counter space . . . Got some sugar in the pantry? You’re in luck! You’re all ready to make some jam.

Now, if you do a little research, you will read all about sterilizing jars, using tongs, finding pectin, and then deciding how much sugar you need depending on the kind and amount of pectin you are using.

Rubbish, I say! If you do it my way, your jam won’t last through the winter, but it will certainly have a nice little shelf life there in your refrigerator. Besides, if it’s good, who cares if it would theoretically be edible in six months? It should be gone!

   Active Image   Ingredients
•fruit (my favorites are strawberries and plums)
•natural cane sugar
•lemon juice (optional-I like it tart)

Directions
1. Put fruit in pot and cover in sugar.
2. Squeeze in a bit of lemon juice (if you’re using it).
3. Boil until done. One way to know when it’s done is to stick a plate in the freezer at the beginning of the process. When the mixture begins to thicken, take the plate out and drop a bit of the jam onto it. If you can run your finger through the jam and leave a clear streak, it’s ready!
4. Allow the jam to cool*, and then pour or ladle it into a jar.
5. Eat!

*Seriously, wait for it to cool. Pouring hot jam into a jar you are holding will make you say “hothothothothothothot” at best, and at worst, could result in real injury.

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