Issue 12  •  Spring 2013

Lali Puna: Our Inventions

Written by Candace Mills
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Is there some sort of repellant one can spray liberally into the air or launch into our atmosphere to stop the viral spread of soulless bands? Lali Puna’s album Our Inventions, for example, came out earlier this year, and I can’t keep my mind peaceful when listening to it. My first impulse is to jam urine-soaked clumping cat litter into my ears. Something needs to be lit on fire as well. I know, readership, I sound like a laptronica hater. I’m not. What I hate is the code red levels of “precious” emanating from every damn song. I also don’t like the word “laptronica.”

Is there some sort of repellant one can spray liberally into the air or launch into our atmosphere to stop the viral spread of soulless bands? Lali Puna’s album Our Inventions, for example, came out earlier this year, and I can’t keep my mind peaceful when listening to it. My first impulse is to jam urine-soaked clumping cat litter into my ears. Something needs to be lit on fire as well. I know, readership, I sound like a laptronica hater. I’m not. What I hate is the code red levels of “precious” emanating from every damn song. I also don’t like the word “laptronica.”

Wanna know what Lali Puna would taste like if you were to eat it? Well, whip out your blender and throw in Conor Oberst , Gus Van Sant, Will Oldham’s character in Slitch, a six-pack of Miller High Life, Miranda July, your Emily the Strange comic books, and a synthesizer. Blend until you can’t tell the items apart. Drink. Vomit. Then drink your vomit. Actually, it may not be that awful. Take out the Miller High Life.

Where’s the heart? I mean, seriously, are these really songs that one would want to play more than once? I will not compare Lali Puna to Stereolab or Air as other writers have because I like those bands. I do recommend Lali Puna go pick up sixty Miller High Life beers and have a sit-down/lock in/sex/listening party soundtracked by the Pastels, Giorgio Moroder, Kraftwerk, Gary Numan, New Order, Peaches, Ultravox, OMD, every Yellow Magic Orchestra album (though YMO’s Yukihiro Takahashi does make a guest appearance on the album and has recorded with LP lead singer Valerie Trebeljahr) and take notes. Study those notes then call me for a live “pop” quiz. No more bad dream-pop, kids. Puh-lease stop with the cutesy crap claptrap lyrics and the pouty-lipped Lolita-lead chanteuse.

To call this sort of noise pollution “pop” would be saying it’s popular. Wait . . . just got that memo. Gulp. This sort of music is popular.

*Reader’s Note: At Sadie, we like to give our trusted reviewers free rein to write what they feel about the artwork they’re reviewing, but we do want to stress/remind you that reviews are one person’s opinion and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of everyone at Sadie.*

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