Issue 12  •  Spring 2013

Reviews

The Museum of Modern Art’s retrospective of Marina Abramovic ’s work, The Artist is Present, dutifully outlines her career, making legitimate claims for performance art as a serious discipline that deserves—no, demands—recognition. Klaus Biesenbach has curated the first large-scale performance-oriented retrospective at MoMA, the logical next step for the museum’s growing interest in collecting performance. Marina Abramovic, the self-proclaimed “grandmother of performance art,” is indisputably one of its main players, so her show is a fitting inauguration for MoMA’s new venture.
 

Quasi: American Gong

Written by Zachary Martin
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I can’t say that Quasi has been on my radar a lot over the past seventeen years. However, they have been making records, and they are one of the few “side project” bands out there that continues to come around, and the results are never bad. Officially forming in 1993 as a duo consisting of husband and wife Sam Coomes and Janet Weiss, Quasi has been making records almost every year since—an impressive feat considering that the band has outlived both a marriage and Coomes and Weiss’s other projects (Coomes has been in Built to Spill, among other acts, and Weiss was in the seminal girl punk trio Sleater-Kinney). While most mortals might think there is more to life than indie rock, Coomes and Weiss thankfully don’t. In 2006 Quasi added veteran indie rocker Joanna Bolme (formally of Stephen Malkmus and the Jicks) to the mix and in 2009 signed on to venerable indie rock label Kill Rock Stars. 
 
The Museum of Modern Art’s retrospective of Marina Abramovic’s work, The Artist is Present, dutifully outlines her career, making legitimate claims for performance art as a serious discipline that deserves—no, demands—recognition. Klaus Biesenbach has curated the first large-scale performance-oriented retrospective at MoMA, the logical next step for the museum’s growing interest in collecting performance. Marina Abramovic, the self-proclaimed “grandmother of performance art,” is indisputably one of its main players, so her show is a fitting inauguration for MoMA’s new venture.
 

Slow Club: Yeah, So

Written by Brady Walker
 Active Image I guess with the Internet and all, one could say there’s been a resurgence in just about anything, probably just because now we can more easily find all those Malian klezmer death metal fusion bands out there. But let’s face facts and admit that the boy-girl singing duo is a herpetic trend, and we are experiencing a flare-up.

   

 

Lali Puna: Our Inventions

Written by Candace Mills
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Is there some sort of repellant one can spray liberally into the air or launch into our atmosphere to stop the viral spread of soulless bands? Lali Puna’s album Our Inventions, for example, came out earlier this year, and I can’t keep my mind peaceful when listening to it. My first impulse is to jam urine-soaked clumping cat litter into my ears. Something needs to be lit on fire as well. I know, readership, I sound like a laptronica hater. I’m not. What I hate is the code red levels of “precious” emanating from every damn song. I also don’t like the word “laptronica.”
 

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